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business photography

June, 2011

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Rights of the Public and the Press – Court Rules For Photogs

I've spent my fair share of time on movie sets. Sometimes, I was the unit photographer, and in other instances, I was tasked with covering the news going on in the community. One of my early assignments had me covering Tom Cruise one Halloween in Georgetown, a tony part of Washington DC, when he was filming a scene for A Few Good Men. Then, myself and a colleague were met with blankets and scrims tossed up in-front of us as Cruise moved about the street, causing us to have to head to a second story window amidst an ongoing Halloween party and some kind revelers who let us “hang out” and make images above the scrims.

On June 24th, Photo District News reported 'Judge Orders Ft. Lauderdale to Allow Photos Near Movie Set' which followed up on their original article 'Ft. Lauderdale Photo Ban: Bought and Paid for by Hollywood?' where photographers were literally banned from places that the general public was allowed to walk freely upon.

The press enjoys not only the full rights and privileges of the general public, but also an expanded right as guaranteed by the first amendment. Thankfully, a judge found on behalf of the press in this emergency ruling. If only I had known about things like emergency rulings way back then, my images of Tom Cruise might be that might better.

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Court Rules Photo Credit Removal a DMCA Violation

Many photographers try to make the lame assertion that they don't care about money, just seeing their work being used, or a photo credit, is all they care about. Well, for those lame-o's, and the rest of us who actually earn a living making pictures, there is now money to be gained when someone removes your photo credit.

As reported by the Copyright Litigation Blog (here), the employees of subjects in a photograph infringed on the photographers rights when scanning the magazine that resulted from the a photo assignment and posting the image online.

While the joke may well still be “will work for photo credit”, the reality is “photo credits can work for you.”

Yet, friends, one more reason you should be registering your work. Lame-o or not, this is business folks. Business.

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VIDEO: How To Establish Assignment Rates for Photographers

A few weeks ago, PhotoShelter was promoting their “Starting a Photography Business” guide, and asked me to say a few words on how to establish fair and reasonable rates for assignments being done. Here's a video of that interview, which they originally posted on their blog, here.

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VIDEO: Typical Business Mistakes Made By Photographers

The good folks over at PhotoShelter interviewed me for a piece they called – “The Typical Business Mistakes Made By Photographers ” and posted the video below as a part of that. Enjoy the video!

Common Business Mistakes Made By Photographers: Interview with John Harrington from PhotoShelter.com on Vimeo.

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STOLEN: Photographer's Rights of Iconic Image

As a youth in the 80's, the Run DMC and Jam-Master Jay were all the rage. The beginning of mainsteam rap that ushered in all the rest.

Photo District News reported here on the news that the photographer has won his lawsuit against an infringer who made all manner of reproductions.

Carolyn Wright, over at PhotoAttorney.com provided some insights worth reading as well, here.

In short, protect your rights. Register your work. You never know when your work will be stolen, and having done the leg work necessary to protect yourself will give you all the tools necessary to protect your rights to the fullest extent of the law.

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