business photography

business photography

February, 2013

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TIPS60 – Should You Have a "Brick and Mortar" location for your business?

Here is another of our videos offering tips and inisights into the business of photography. a transcript of the video is included after the jump.

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TRANSCRIPT:Here are a few thoughts on the benefits and drawbacks of having a brick and mortar location. I'm John Harrington. One of the questions that so many photographers ask themselves is, “”Do I need a studio, do I need a physical location in a building. Either in a warehouse district or in a downtown commercial district to make my pictures to review and receive clients?”” In many instances the answer is no, you don't. For over twenty years we've been making pictures, portraits on location, portraits in commercial and corporate offices or we go to the client And portraits of our subjects in all manner of locale, but none of which required a studio. We've never rented studio that's not to say that we haven't shot in a studio environment. So think very carefully about whether or not you need to incur the five, ten, twenty thousand dollar a month rents that are associated with having a brick and mortar location and see if you can cover that in your overhead.


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TIPS60 – Product Commentary – prime lenses vs. zoom lenses

Here is another of our videos offering tips and inisights into the business of photography. a transcript of the video is included after the jump.

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TRANSCRIPT:Here are a few thoughts on primes versus zooms. I'm John Harrington. There is a great deal of debate amongst photographers about whether you should shoot with a prime, whether you should shoot with a zoom. Zooms are great lenses because of course you can be at 24mm, wide open and then all of a sudden you need zoom in to 70mm, no problem, a 24-70mm is a really common zoom lens. If you have the opportunity though, I would strongly encourage you to consider primes. Camera manufacturers still make primes for good reason. They're great lenses, they're sharp a 24mm prime is going to be sharper at 24mm then a 24mm zoom will be at 24mm. It's a crisper lens, it really also is a lens that makes you give a little more thought to what you're doing picture wise, your framing, and so on and so forth. You can't just fix it in zoom. Everyone likes to say, “”Well, fix it in post”” or “”Don't fix it in post””. Fixing it by zooming is a little different than fixing it by changing lenses and changing position. So strongly encourage you to consider prime lenses. Prime lenses are a great tool when you're really trying to just be thoughtful about the image you're making.


Please post your comments by clicking the link below. If you've got questions, please pose them in our Photo Business Forum Flickr Group Discussion Threads.

TIPS60 – How to be paid what you are worth(and get clients to do so willingly)

Here is another of our videos offering tips and inisights into the business of photography. a transcript of the video is included after the jump.

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TRANSCRIPT:Here are a few thoughts on how to get paid what you're worth. I'm John Harrington. In order for you to be paid what you're worth, you actually have to demonstrate to clients what you are worth. Sometimes that's a challenge, but the key thing to do is to convince the client that you're worth “”x”” dollars. If you don't convince the client that you're worth that then ultimately what's going to happen is the client's going to decide what they think it's worth off the top of their head and generally speaking what they think it's worth and what it really is worth is always a very disparate figure. The key thing to do is to not only demonstrate that you'll be there for say twenty minutes or a half an hour doing a portrait, but that not only are you there for that period of time, but you are there for an hour before hand setting up and a half an hour, forty five minutes, afterwards breaking down. You'll be doing work on the computer for a couple of hours afterwards to make their portrait look just right and then in addition to that they'll be able to use that picture for years to come based upon the photography licensing and you provide to them. So it's not just fifteen minute shoot, it's actually much longer than that.


Please post your comments by clicking the link below. If you've got questions, please pose them in our Photo Business Forum Flickr Group Discussion Threads.

TIPS60 – Using 2/10 Net 30 to Incentivize Faster Payment

Here is another of our videos offering tips and inisights into the business of photography. a transcript of the video is included after the jump.

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TRANSCRIPT:Here's an explanation of 2/10 Net 30. I'm John Harrington. 2/10 Net 30 is an accounting term that tells you as the buyer of a product the you can take a two percent discount from the total bill, the total invoice, if you pay in ten days. Otherwise, the net amount is due in thirty days. So if you are sending a bill to a client and you place on the bill 2/10 Net 30 you're trying to provide that client with the incentive to pay that bill within ten days of receipt and therefore allowing them to take a two percent discount. Now a two percent discounts not a big deal when you're talking about a hundred dollars, it's two dollars, thousand dollars, is twenty dollars, so 2/10 Net 30 is really a good incentivisation to give clients to get them to pay you on time or early in this case. So 2/10 Net 30 is a really good accounting tool to get clients to pay you on time or early.


Please post your comments by clicking the link below. If you've got questions, please pose them in our Photo Business Forum Flickr Group Discussion Threads.
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