business photography

business photography

November, 2013

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TIPS60 – The importance of having disability insurance

Here is another of our videos offering tips and inisights into the business of photography. a transcript of the video is included after the jump.

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TRANSCRIPT:Here are a few thoughts on disability insurance. I'm John Harrington. Disability insurance both short-term disability and long-term disability is something that you should have as a part of your kind of business package of insurance as a photographer. Frankly, for any business where you have the option you should take disability insurance. Should you become disabled for three weeks, a month, six months, or a year, having disability insurance allows for you to have an ongoing stream of income from that insurance policy while you're recuperating, while you're recovering, so that you can get back to work. So that you don't have to actually sell-off assets in order to pay your bills and just generally lets you stay within the house that you have you know, other accommodations, things to provide for your family. Having disability insurance, comparable to long term care insurance, but just kind of a different flavor is something you should look into. Talk to your accountant about the tax deductability of it, but it's not that much and generally speaking it's less than $100 a month.


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TIPS60 – Maintaining your independence

Here is another of our videos offering tips and inisights into the business of photography. a transcript of the video is included after the jump.

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TRANSCRIPT:Here are a few thoughts about maintaining your independence. I'm John Harrington. Now when I say maintaining in your independence I'm not talking about having working an employee or working for one particular corporation I'm really talking about not getting into discussions with your clients that could end up causing you to not work for them again because they don't like your political leanings. Now we're based here in Washington, DC and you know there's democrats, republicans and then there's a few independents. I strongly encourage you, at least when you're dealing with political issues, to not be discussing the hot-button topic items of the day at least not in a situation where you're taking a position because it really could be contrary to your clients. We work with democrat clients, republican clients, and yes occasionally independents, but really stay away from having those conversations with clients unless you really know them well and you have a relationship with them outside of your work environment. It just really doesn't bode well for you to have those types of conversations for long-term success in this field.


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TIPS60 – Charging a "Sitting Fee" for the Family Portrait

Here is another of our videos offering tips and inisights into the business of photography. a transcript of the video is included after the jump.

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TRANSCRIPT:Here are a few thoughts on family portraits and sitting fees. I'm John Harrington. We love doing portraits, with a couple, with the whole family, where we get to sit down and talk to them about how they would like to have this timeless moment with either, just a couple or an entire family memorialized, because it really is going to become a family heirloom. So when we do that and the time that we invest in sitting down with them and talking to them the time that we spend actually taking the picture, we do charge a sitting fee for and it's important. Sitting fees can be as little as you know $200 to as much as $500 when you're working with a couple. It locks in your time. It does compensate you for your time working with them beforehand and also when you there on the day of the shoot, taking those pictures. If, after the fact, the couple or the family doesn't like any of the pictures they still have to pay for the sitting fee, but if they do like their pictures then that's when they have to end up paying for the enlargement.


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TIPS60 – How to upsell prints for Family Portraits.

Here is another of our videos offering tips and inisights into the business of photography. a transcript of the video is included after the jump.

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TRANSCRIPT:Here are a few thoughts on helping your client select the right size family portrait after you've done the photography. I'm John Harrington. Now, when you sit down with a client and talk to them about what size do want, you really shouldn't be talking in sizes, 8×10, 11×14, 16×20 because in most people's mind 8×10 is as large as they need. So I would encourage you to use sizes like desk size, small wall size, medium wall size, large wall size. That really helps the client understand where the picture's going to go, helps you understand what they're looking for and gets everybody away from this 8×10 figure that nobody seems to want to go above. Sometimes you can bring a portrait that you've done for somebody else into a home and show it up on a wall for the client to see how that size would look in their home and help them decide based upon size commensurate with the wall and not just based upon the numbers.


Please post your comments by clicking the link below. If you've got questions, please pose them in our Photo Business Forum Flickr Group Discussion Threads.
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